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Bickerton Junction 1607 Country 2015 - Folding Bike

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Product description

The Bickerton Junction 1607 Country blends a classic design with a super stylish colour scheme. The Junction folds in seconds into a compact package that is easy to store on the tube or public transport.

Strengthening gussets are fitted to the folding beam design for long lasting performance. Small 20” wheels and 7 speed gearing allow you to nip through side streets and cycle paths to get to your destination.

Key Features

  • Easy folding mechanism takes just seconds
  • 7 speed gearing for nipping through traffic
  • Strong alloy V-brakes for confident riding
  • Durable alloy rims
  • Size: 20W
  • Colour: Oxford Blue / White
  • Weight: 12.4kg (27.3lb)
  • Max Rider Weight: 105kg (231lb)

The Bickerton Junction 1607 Country 2015 Features are:

Frame: Bickerton custom alloy, mono stay with folding beam design, fitted with strengthening gussets

Fork: Hi-tensile steel narrow track

Bars: 6061 alloy flat bar

Stem: Q - lock forged telescopic alloy

Speed: 7

Rear Mech: Shimano Tourney

Shifters Shimano Revo shift

Chainset: Cold forged alloy single with ring guard

Cassette: Shimano 14-28 freewheel 7 speed

Front Brake: Alloy V style

Rear Brake: Alloy V style

Rims: Alloy

Front Hub: Alloy

Rear Hub: Alloy

Spokes: Stainless

Tyres: Impac Street Pac with reflective side strip Front - Impac Street Pac with reflective side strip Rear

Weight: 12.4KG

Occasionally without notice, manufacturers sometimes change product specifications

Bickerton Junction 1607 Country 2015 - Folding Bike Reviews

Write your own review
Overall Rating:
4.2
out of 5
4.16
Build Quality
4.50
Performance
4
Value For Money
4.00

Customer Reviews (2)

5
Not much to bicker about with my Bickerton!

I guess with any bike purchase it's a case of horses for courses as they say. Now that I am retired my demands on a bike are less arduous than that of an ardent commuter or serious road or off road cyclist. What I wanted was a cycle that I could take abroad with me when I'm touring with the caravan. I intend to use it for the occasional trip to the shops but mainly as a means of keeping fit. So I anticipate a few early morning rides out while my wife cooks the breakfast! When making my decision as to which bike to buy I started off with a wish list which looked a bit like this:- 1, it should be folding; 2, it should fit into the boot space of a small hatchback; 3, it shouldn't take an age to fold/unfold; 4, it should be robust but not too heavy; 5, it should be reliable; 6, it should have a sufficient gearing range that would suit hilly as well as flat terrain; 7, it shouldn't be too expensive. I then did some research both online and around a number of bicycle shops, of which there are many in Cambridge. I also spoke to the technical guys at Tredz before making my final choice. After a while I narrowed my search down to 3 main contenders, Brompton, Dawes and Bickerton, I dismissed the Brompton purely for cost reasons. Of course the sales people will say that with a Brompton you are buying into quality, reliability, durability and some say good second-hand values That's true if you want to use it day in day out as a commuter cycle. In the end I wavered between the Dawes Kingpin and the Bickerton Junction Country, which were similar in design and price but decided to go for the Bickerton. Does it fit my wish list? I would say overall yes it does. However there are a couple of niggles. Niggle 1, it doesn't fold quite as easily as I had been lead to believe and the instructions that came with it aren't all that clear. There is a magnet on the rear forks which is supposed to mate with a metal disc on the front fork when the bike is folded. However try as I might, I could not fold the bike so that these two things came anywhere close to each other. After several tries I found that I had to turn the handlebars into a certain position within the stem, then slide the stem into the headset to a very precise extent so that when the bike is folded the bars do not foul the frame thus enabling the aforementioned magnet and disc to make contact. I have now marked the relevant positions of the various components so that I don't have this problem in the future. Niggle 2. Cambridge, as most people will know is quite flat and what I quickly found is that the highest gear isn't as high as I had anticipated. Therefore on the flat, the crank revolutions have to remain high in order to maintain a reasonable speed. However I am hoping that the range of gears that I do have will be appropriate for my rides out in France and Spain. I guess I could have paid more and got a slightly lighter model with a better gear range but I think that what I have, is a very good compromise at a very reasonable price. .

I guess with any bike purchase it's a case of horses for courses as they say. Now that I am retired my demands on a bike are less arduous than that of an ardent commuter or serious road or off road cyclist. What I wanted was a cycle that I could take abroad with me when I'm touring with the caravan. I intend to use it for the occasional trip to the shops but mainly as a means of keeping fit. So I anticipate a few early morning rides out while my wife cooks the breakfast! When making my decision as to which bike to buy I started off with a wish list which looked a bit like this:- 1, it should be folding; 2, it should fit into the boot space of a small hatchback; 3, it shouldn't take an age to fold/unfold; 4, it should be robust but not too heavy; 5, it should be reliable; 6, it should have a sufficient gearing range that would suit hilly as well as flat terrain; 7, it shouldn't be too expensive. I then did some research both online and around a number of bicycle shops, of which there are many in Cambridge. I also spoke to the technical guys at Tredz before making my final choice. After a while I narrowed my search down to 3 main contenders, Brompton, Dawes and Bickerton, I dismissed the Brompton purely for cost reasons. Of course the sales people will say that with a Brompton you are buying into quality, reliability, durability and some say good second-hand values That's true if you want to use it day in day out as a commuter cycle. In the end I wavered between the Dawes Kingpin and the Bickerton Junction Country, which were similar in design and price but decided to go for the Bickerton. Does it fit my wish list? I would say overall yes it does. However there are a couple of niggles. Niggle 1, it doesn't fold quite as easily as I had been lead to believe and the instructions that came with it aren't all that clear. There is a magnet on the rear forks which is supposed to mate with a metal disc on the front fork when the bike is folded. However try as I might, I could not fold the bike so that these two things came anywhere close to each other. After several tries I found that I had to turn the handlebars into a certain position within the stem, then slide the stem into the headset to a very precise extent so that when the bike is folded the bars do not foul the frame thus enabling the aforementioned magnet and disc to make contact. I have now marked the relevant positions of the various components so that I don't have this problem in the future. Niggle 2. Cambridge, as most people will know is quite flat and what I quickly found is that the highest gear isn't as high as I had anticipated. Therefore on the flat, the crank revolutions have to remain high in order to maintain a reasonable speed. However I am hoping that the range of gears that I do have will be appropriate for my rides out in France and Spain. I guess I could have paid more and got a slightly lighter model with a better gear range but I think that what I have, is a very good compromise at a very reasonable price. .

Close review
4.7 out of 5
Build Quality: 5/5
Performance: 4/5
Value For Money: 5/5
4
good

the bike is heavy . and no clip to attach when folding it .. except those two points , im happy with it.

the bike is heavy . and no clip to attach when folding it .. except those two points , im happy with it.

Close review
3.7 out of 5
Build Quality: 4/5
Performance: 4/5
Value For Money: 3/5